Suga becomes highest ranking Korean solo singer ever on Billboard 200 albums chart

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                                Suga becomes highest ranking Korean solo singer ever on Billboard 200 albums chart

                                Suga's mixtape "D-2" released under his stage name Agust D [BIG HIT ENTERTAINMENT]

                                Suga's mixtape "D-2" released under his stage name Agust D [BIG HIT ENTERTAINMENT]

                                 
                                 
                                Suga of K-pop sensation BTS has become the highest ranking Korean solo singer on the Billboard 200 chart with his latest mixtape, landing at No. 11 of the albums chart with "D-2." 
                                 
                                According to Billboard's official Twitter account, "D-2" debuted on the 11th spot on Billboard's main albums chart this week, recording the highest ever reached by a Korean solo singer — beating his own bandmates RM and J-Hope, who each peaked at No. 26 and No. 38, respectively.
                                 
                                It also reached No. 7 on the British Official Albums Chart, becoming the first Korean solo act to land in the top 10 slot of the chart. The lead track "Daechwita" hit No. 68 of the singles chart. 
                                 
                                "D-2" was released on May 22 under Suga's stage name Agust D, distributed for free through Google and Soundcloud. The mixtape sat atop the iTunes Top Album chart in 80 regions around the world immediately after it dropped. 
                                 
                                Suga of BTS [BIG HIT ENTERTAINMENT]

                                Suga of BTS [BIG HIT ENTERTAINMENT]

                                 
                                 
                                Suga was heavily criticized by the public when it was revealed that he sampled a portion of a 1978 speech given by cult leader Jim Jones for track "What Do You Think?" 

                                 
                                While his agency apologized for failing to properly monitor the music produced by its artist, Suga was further criticized when people discovered he said he put "traps for cockroaches" in his songs — mentioning the two tracks "Daechwita" and "What Do You Think?" 
                                 
                                Big Hit Entertainment, his agency, explained that the sampled audio was put in by another producer who worked on the song "without properly realizing the historical and social background behind it." 
                                 
                                "We apologize to everyone who would have been hurt or felt uncomfortable. We deleted the said portion and re-released it," the agency said. 
                                 
                                BY YOON SO-YEON   [yoon.soyeon@joongang.co.kr] 

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